Archive for category Filming

Donnie and Amanda take a road trip…

July 1 starts the new fiscal year for the Oklahoma Film Commission rebate program.

That means, if you are an actor, July in Oklahoma means that there are lots of opportunities to get acting gigs.

So, Don and I start submitting. We knew that we had submitted for a gig for Wednesday. Tuesday I head off to my day job, planning on checking messages on my lunch break and again after work.

When I looked at my phone at 4:30ish, I had a ton of messages.

The casting office had texted us at 12:56pm that we had been cast for the gig. They were sending an email. You had to confirm the email by 2pm.

Yep – that was a whole whopping 64 minute window there.

Don had his phone with him the whole time, and got the text in time. But, the email never came through. And you needed to confirm via EMAIL and he never got it.

I went to my lunch break and contacted them back saying that we were available, and was the slot still open? (Yes, I know it was way later than the 2pm deadline, but I wanted to try.) At that point – (by now it’s after 5pm), we learned that the location was way, way, way further away than we knew.

Don still hadn’t gotten that first email. I contacted them after 5. We both figured that we can kiss this gig goodbye.

At 6:36, we got the confirmation text. We got the job!

Yeah!

We knew we had a massively long drive to get there. We can do it. But I am scared of an early call time, and I have done NOTHING to prepare. Haven’t checked over the car, haven’t gotten cash for the day, haven’t prepared snacks/water/drinks/emergency supplies, haven’t prepared wardrobe, etc.

After we are confirmed on the job, we get an email with instructions. It is all basic stuff, bring three outfits (they told the location of the film’s setting and what type of attire is desirable), no cameras on set, don’t approach the main actors, behave on set, etc. Just basic stuff. And luckily for us, the call time is 2:30pm.

Whew!

Wednesday we have a time set when we are going to leave. Each of us has wardrobe, emergency supplies, and we each brought snacks/beverages. 99% of the time, production provides water &/or food. But having been stranded on a gig once, without basic supplies, I will do everything in my power to not go through that again.

We stop for lunch along this (very, very) long drive. At least we are fueled up  – food-wise I mean. The weather is gorgeous. We have had days earlier this month with massive heat already, but lucky for us, a cool front on Monday took the temperature down by about 20* (F).

Since I couldn’t take pics on set, and I can’t share details, here is my one photograph:

We saw a whole lotta highway on the way to this gig! LOL

We got there early. We found a circle of folding chairs under shade trees. We asked if this was where we were supposed to be?

It turned out to be the best afternoon. Everyone on this production treated everyone with dignity and respect. That goes such a long way towards making an acting job be a good experience. At first they said they might get a trailer for us. But the weather was so nice, and it was pleasant, and our green room was a nice afternoon spent under shade trees. The on camera location was close by. They had great craft services. The business next door opened their restroom to the production. Our basic needs were taken care of.

The best part was the other actors that day. We met some great people. It was fun to hang out and share stories (both acting and non-acting stories). We exchanged contact info. It is great to meet like-minded people who do what we do.

We all laughed – a lot!

For privacy reasons, and to comply with our instructions, I won’t reveal any specific details about the gig. We were released a lot earlier than I thought we would be. It would have been fine if we had had to work late. I was expecting to get home about 4 am. Getting home any time before that would have been nice, and we got home well before that time.

That being said, I was still pretty tired. Don drove all the way there, and most of the way back. (Thank you!)

I hope everyone out there is doing great – and I send you all best wishes as you are out there, too, in pursuit of your dreams!

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Movie credits

Do you read movie credits?

I have always read movie credits? I kinda baffles me when you are in the theater, and as soon as the credits start to roll, people stand up to leave.

Back in the olden days…when we had the gentle sloping movie theater floors….I’d have to stand up at that point, just to see the credits. Thank goodness for stadium seating – where I can now sit down to read the credits. But I got in the habit of staying thru till the bitter end…because they put the music credits at the end, and I’d want to see who sang what song.

Then, it became a measure of respect…it takes tons of people to make a movie. If something was on the screen for two seconds, well….that may have taken eight hours to film. People work hard to make movies, even if that amount of time is not proportionally represented on screen.

So, I read names…names that I have never heard before and will never hear again.

Then THIS happens:

A movie that I worked on years ago came on late night cable. I have not yet had the opportunity to see it.

I watched it to see if I got edited in. Boom! I did. Twice – not that you can tell it’s me.

Then you watch the credits. As an actor,  I have made several movies for other people. I have yet to be included in the credits….

Until now! That’s me!

Seventh name down on the list.

Leave a comment

15, 496 and One!

When we were filming the cattle drive movie last September, Don pitched the idea that we should travel Highway 81 in Oklahoma, and film the historical Chisholm Trail sites.

Sounds great!

It only took me a year to be able to execute that. We finalized the movie a couple of weeks ago. Obviously, the “historic sites” video isn’t in that.

But there are so many other video projects we want to do about the Chisholm Trail, and maybe a week ago, we started talking about this trip.

We set a day that worked for both of our schedules: Monday. Sounds great.

“What’s the plan?” Don texted me. I said, “Leave at 9.”

Our plan all along was to make it to Okarche, which happens to have the best fried chicken in Oklahoma, and have lunch. Sounds fun. Drive around some, film, laugh, enjoy the day, take photographs, have lunch.

At 9, Don and I climb in the car and head out. The first thing I wanted to find was when we were out on the trail, I remembered a little metal sign, hanging from a post. Well, we drove around and around and never did find it. Was it actually there? Or did I dream it?

And off we go…down the old Chisholm Trail. Places that are on the trail, have signs telling you the location of the trail, such as this.

That’s helpful. You know you are in the right location. There are several historical markers across the state. We plan to film a few of the historic sites, to use in a future video.

Now, keep in mind…our plan was to eat the best fried chicken in Oklahoma for lunch. So, I had a light breakfast, about 6am. I was hungry. After awhile, Don asks, “How far are we going to go?”

I said that I didn’t have a plan. I had planned to drive around and find some historical markers to film, and we’d eat lunch. But…if we got to such-and-such place, we could do this. If we got to such-and-such town, I wanted to visit a cemetery where I have family buried.

Don said, “Are we going to go all the way to the river?”

And we kinda looked at each other and said, “Why the hell not?”

And I am hungry and we are nowhere close to the best fried chicken in the state of Oklahoma. Don suggested we get a bite to eat on the way, and we’d have our chicken for supper on the way back up the trail.

Okayyyyy….

And away we flew…down the trail, stopping to film things along the way, knowing there were some places we’d stop to film on the way back.

You know what? Oklahoma is a big state!

I started off driving. I had pulled a file off the internet, and when printed, it came to 9 pages. I got the highlighter and highlighted town names, (which were not in any kind of geographic order.) There was an atlas in the car.

I had figured we’d drive and we’d see those brown signs above, then we’d know where to stop.

Yeah, um, not so much. Don read the instructions, then translated them, and  tried to figure out locations.  At one point he was coordinating the printout, the map, a map we got from a museum, and his phone, trying to pinpoint the location of the Chisholm Trail. He took a lot of notes, about where we’d been, what we had filmed, and what was still to filmed.

As he said, this would have gone a lot better with better research and planning.

Planning? What planning? I had no idea we were going to go south of I-40! LOL

We found some amazing sites. History is mind-blowing!

A man named Bob Klemme engineered a project to place these markers across Oklahoma on the Chisholm Trail.

One of the most amazing sites was east of Addington.

This obelisk sits on a hill that served as a lookout on the Chisholm Trail.

If you make it that far, you gotta cross the Red River into Texas! I rolled down the window to breathe some Texas air, and we started back north. By this point, you gotta calculate the miles of where you are, where you need to go next, and how much daylight you have left.

Needless to say, we didn’t get to film everything. But it was fun.

As the sun set, the next worry becomes…what time does the fried chicken place close?

I called them. They close at 10.

At long last, after a FULL day, where we hadn’t planned enough, hadn’t researched enough, and didn’t know enough, we got to the restaurant that serves the best fried chicken in Oklahoma. Eischen’s Bar!

Woo hoo!

There are eight items on the menu. A whole fried chicken is at the top of the list.

The waiter asked what we wanted. I said chicken. Don said okra.

When the food came, we were happy, happy people! (We’d only been waiting All Day to get to some fried chicken!) (We’d only been crawling in and out of the car, in the near 100* heat and lugging cameras around All Day to film a project that we didn’t plan for nearly well enough.)

Don’s phone logged our locations and the trip.

On rest of the way home, driving in the darkness along the old Chisholm Trail, we put some western swing in the CD player, and sang along under the night sky.

FIFTEEN hours!

Four hundred ninety-six miles.

And ONE WHOLE fried chicken later…we got back to the place where we started.

You’d think that would be enough! I mean, geez…come on! 496 miles. Only a glutton for punishment would do that, right?

So, what happens next?

Um…gulp! Kansas!

1 Comment

It’s done!

We have a completed movie!

It still doesn’t feel real. This movie has been in works for close to a year. That’s almost one year of this project…a project which is so big, it seems like a mountain that is so high that you can’t climb it.

One year of a project so insurmountable, that you can’t even think how to approach it. To work through this, I had to break it into segments, then break that into segments, then break that into segments. Then figure out each segment. Then put it all together. And *hope* that there is something there that people will connect with.

Did we accomplish it?

I have no idea.

I *hope so*!!!

Not only do we have a completed movie, we made it in time to enter the Sundance Film Festival this year. As of today, we have that entry submitted.

None of this feels real yet. Maybe six weeks ago, I had this moment of disheartened anguish that we were not going to have a Sundance submission this year. This Cattle Drive movie is unique. This is our best opportunity to say to the world, “Hey…we make movies!” or “We are artists!” or…”Let us entertain you!”

So, the thought of things being delayed, even further, just sank me to a new low.

Then whammo! It all starts to come together. When those puzzle pieces started falling into place, they fell into place. And made a pretty doggone good movie!

There is still a lot of work on this project to be done (need to build our short film for children, need to build a trailer, press kit, incorporate subtitles in the big movie, build a movie poster, work some smaller youtube videos utilizing some of the other footage.)

My biggest problem with this project – once the movie was actually done, is to figure out the DVD encoding, processing and compression.

Ick!

Why can’t there be a road map for these problems?

I *should* take a moment or two, and savor the “Look what we’ve done so far!” moment. But that moment hasn’t hit yet.

Maybe soon…

In the meantime…imagine your best Don LaFontaine voice:

“Chisholm Trail – Past and Present…..coming soon, to a film festival screening near you!”

3 Comments

The end is in sight!

Have you ever put a puzzle together? And I don’t mean one of those easy ones with the picture on the box.

What’s the biggest puzzle you have put together – when you don’t know what the finished project will look like?

The editing on the Chisholm Trail movie is almost done!

Whew!

Woo hoo!

(Sigh of exhaustion).

We didn’t have a script. We didn’t a preset story in mind. We went out to film this, completely blind as to what the finished movie would be.

(See the September 2017 archives for blog entries about the Cattle drive and the filming.)

This is a documentary. We tried to tell a story. Did we capture the story of the 2017 Chisholm Trail Cattle Drive?

When you see the movie, you can answer that question!

Editing a movie isn’t easy.

Let me say that again:

EDITING A MOVIE ISN’T EASY!?!?!?!?!!?!

That statement is not intended to be a complaint. But it is a statement of fact. I keep using the line, “If we were in Hollywood, there would be sixty people doing what we are doing.” In our filmmaking endeavors – we have two.

My partner Don and I work well together. We each have our strengths and they dovetail together.

I have to build the structure of the project. But once there is something there to work with, Don can come in and edit it/work it/tear it apart/make it better….and still have enough energy to make me a cheesecake!

…from scratch!

See…I TOLD you we work well together!! LOL

Once we were properly snacked up, fed, fueled up and ready to go…we dove in.

It took a lot of steps to get to this point. And I am not talking about the filming. This is “after” the filming is done, and we have the movie footage “in the can”.

Then what?

Log the footage. View the footage. Evaluate the footage. Make notations.

Then THINK. Think of what this will be. Think of what to do and what not to do. Sometimes the decisions you make about what not to do, are more important than what you actually include.

Develop an intro that will “grab” the audience.

Find *something* that will touch the human. What tells the story? What makes you care? What makes you want to know more about a cattle drive?

Plan your video shots that tell the story.

You don’t just put a bunch of video clips together and then be done.

Plan, build and create your audio track. This was the big job on this movie. A cattle drive happens outdoors – in the wind and bugs and weather (and the cars, humans, dogs, lawnmowers, planes, drones, trains). We knew that a lot of the on-site audio would be questionable.

Plan your music fills. I have a recording studio, so I worked that and built the smaller music myself.

Write the voice over track. Record the voice over track. Import that into the footage and sync it to the video.

So, let’s say that you’ve done all that. Let’s say that you have put months and months of your life into this project.

Let’s say that at some random point….say today’s random point…you know that you are close to showing this project (which you have carried so close to your heart), to the world.

You have to face the reality: what if the world doesn’t like it? What if I didn’t do my job? What if we didn’t tell the story? What if the audience doesn’t care?

You have to get up your gumption and your courage.

Being an artist is about putting yourself out there. It is standing on your feet and making a declaration: Hello, world! I am a filmmaker and I have something to say!

 

Leave a comment

No vocal booth? Um…no problem

One of our voice over artists has attempted to record the voice over (VO) on his own – with his existing equipment. The quality of his performance was great! But the quality of the audio was lacking.

The solution is to record him with actual audio editing software, so that I could engineer the session, and try to record the best original source material at a clean audio.

We met at a hotel this week, and I had all my equipment with me. (It felt like I had more electronics in the car – than I had left at home! Ha)

Now…the problems: an unknown environment. This hotel has a heating/air conditioning system that has a continuous fan. You can turn the actual air conditioner off, but you still have a background noise. Who knows what kind of interference you might get from any electrical appliances?

And you have walls and objects that are going to bounce sound.

At first I set up a location for him to sit on a chair and talk into pillows. Nope. That ain’t gonna work.

There was a recessed area next to the cabinet where the television sat. I got a hotel blanket and we created a makeshift vocal booth. We positioned a chair very close to the blanket, so that he was facing a blanket and *hopefully* that is going to absorb sound bounce/block the fan of the air conditioner.

Make shift vocal booth

Then it took a whole lot of monkeying with the audio software to find the best settings. That just takes time. There is no way around it. Do an audio test. Adjust. Test again. Adjust.

Finally we arrive at  what…(I hope) is a good setting. Again, with audio engineering, there is no “one best way”. You make your best guestimate, and you dive in.

Voice over artist Tommy Ball.

When you engineer a session like this…it takes all your concentration. It takes all your focus. So rather than me running the alternate lines, we had a volunteer who, ever so kindly, offered to help (ie–she said she was leaving the hotel room for us to work and I am going…NOOOOO! You have to stay and read lines!)

Karen Ball feeds lines during the recording.

Her lines will not be used in the final recording. But it is critical to have someone help out in this way…to give your voice over artist something to play off of. You get a rhythm in your dialog, and having those lines spoken aloud really helps.

Bless him…Tommy Ball read take after take after take after take.

He put so much effort into this: first of all–being willing to take the gig in the first place. Then you learn your lines. Then you craft a ‘performance’ of how to sell your character. Then, you attempt to record your work in your own home on your own equipment. Whew!

Mind you – the other voice actor recorded his lines in my studio some weeks back. It’s not like the two voice actors were in the same room – working at the same time, and playing off of each other’s character.

No, it is that much harder – to work solo, to have no idea what the other actor is doing, and still “pull off” the performance.

What is the measure of a good performance?

Well, at our previous session – with different actors, we were outdoors, and the person who is on cam and on mike was so amazing. I glanced behind me, and one man had his hand over his mouth and his eyes were bulging out, trying to stifle laughter while we were recording.

This time?? Tommy “sold” that character soooo well, I had to clap my hand over my mouth to hold back the laughter, and hope like heck that I hadn’t made any noise that would ruin the take!

We have had so many volunteers, giving freely of their time and effort and energy – to help a movie get made.

But things are progressing.

“Head ’em up…move ’em out!”

Leave a comment

It takes an artist…

I was speaking with one of the cattle drive organizers this week. In the course of the conversation about building our footage into a movie, she said, “It takes an artist…”   …to do this. To build the movie. To tell the story. To connect to an audience.

Building this movie is not about stringing a series of video clips together.

Building this movie is about finding that “hook”. What will “hook” a viewer? What will “grab” an audience and make them want to stay along for this journey?

What story do you tell? How do you start? How do you end? What happens in between?

What do you include? What do you discard?

Building this movie is a process that is the complete opposite of any of my other normal work patterns. If I write a mystery, then I know all along what the end will be. If I take an original song and go into the recording studio to build a complete full instrumentation final track, then I have a pretty good idea what I am aiming for. If I am rehearsing a piano performance or a vocal performance, then I have an end result that I already know. The work involved is about getting it “up to snuff” so that the end result is what I want it to be.

On this project…we went in with no expectations. The story evolved as the cattle drive evolved. We were not shooting “to” any particular script.

It is only now…now that the cattle drive is over, that we can start to contemplate what the movie might be once it is done.

And for me…this is so contrary to my normal process, it feels like I am blind. The vastness of the unknown tends to overwhelm.

How do you take this footage that was shot – and build it into a piece of art?

Have you ever watched a movie, and for the entire movie, You Just Don’t Get It? You sit there and kinda stare with a puzzled look on your face, and when it is over, you can go, “I don’t know what happened?” or…”What were they thinking?”

I don’t want that to happen here.

Right now, I am still going over the footage.

On Wednesday, I had a couple of (tiny) ideas about where to take this project and where to go.

We are working with the possibility of using this footage to build three movies. Each will be different. Finally on that Wednesday, I gleaned an idea of how to start Movie #1.

It was about finding that perfect shot. This shot was filmed to the east against a morning sunrise. A cattle drive participant is in the foreground, in silhouette. I have been playing with a guitar line in my head for weeks now. But when I saw that shot, my head automatically played that guitar line.

Then you drop the video of that shot off into a complete fade out to black. Then grab another shot. Hold it for the same amount of time, then do the same fade out. Then a group shot, again in silhouette. Fade to black. Finally, and by complete accident, I have a shot once the sun is up, and it made a beautiful lens flair. The sun is on the horizon. The air is golden, and there is this perfect lens flair. One of the wagon drivers is in the foreground, holding the reigns of two horses, which are not yet hitched to the wagon. I didn’t plan that shot. I just happened to be in the right place at the right time.

On each shot, you have this same plantive guitar line.

Then boom!

The movie takes off.

If I am going to start it its way, then I will take movie #2 and start it completely different. That is still up in the air, but I thought up how to end movie #2.

Movie #3 will be built to educate and entertain young children – say ages eight and under. We know we can’t keep and hold their attention for long, so this movie will be very short in duration. But we have a great premise, and once we came up with that idea, which was about midpoint through the cattle drive, then we started to look for opportunities to film to that.

On Wednesday, when these ideas are starting to percolate around in my head, I wrote a good bit of the dialog for this children’s movie.

Speaking of how these shots came out (such as the lens flair sunrise shot above)…what is the status of the footage so far?

Well, what blows me away is – of the stuff I shot for the first week – what I thought was good…was probably 90% crap. I knew I was “shaky” on days 1 and 2. I don’t mean shaky camera footage, but I knew that mentally I was not dialed in. On that Wednesday, it felt like I finally “got it”. Out there in the field, it felt like I was finally “on”.

When I looked at that footage. Wow. Not good.

Therefore – what I thought was good – was not.

What has surprised me about the footage? Well…it was when I thought I only had “average” shots and things were rather on the boring side – those are the moments that are leaping up at me, in post production.

In this editing process, what are some of the problems? Well, for starters, I do not possess the face recognition gene. They call it face blindness.

I knew perhaps five of the cattle drive participants before the drive. For the rest, I met them out on the trail. And my head is already full of all the movie details, cinematography, heat exhaustion, sleep deprivation, etc. Under normal circumstances, I can meet someone. When I see them the next time, I am probably not going to recognize them.

On this cattle drive, the problem was amplified. I know that on day twelve, I said to one of the drovers, “I don’t think I have met you yet.”

When I look at the footage…well…now… he and I had a nice conversation on day three!

To all of the drovers, I apologize.

Now that we are editing…it’s the same problem. I am having to vidcap (capture one frame of a video) a still image and email it to find out who is who.

This has become a major problem that I did not foresee.

What else happened out there? On a few occasions, people might take it upon themselves to saddle their horse and ride along. If we filmed this, then we need to be aware of who is who and not edit that person in the movie.

Yes, it’s fun to go out and cowboy. If someone had a horse in a parade, and if that person rode along behind the drive…then …I can maybe comprehend that.
But when people rode their own horses, uninvited, onto private property, and inserted themselves, unauthorized and without permission, into the process…then that offends me.

Another issue: audio.

Yes. I have talked about audio issues for months now. When we were out there, and if the wind was blowing, then I had a “level” of gain at which I would set the microphone.

It turns out that that level worked. We cut the wind noise. But the audio signal was pretty doggone low. I hate it that it is so low. I will have to look at ways to “boost” that audio signal, and then reintroduce that audio line back into the video software. I haven’t worked this problem yet, but I probably don’t have the software nor technology here to do so.

As with everything else in the field of moviemaking, video editing, and audio production…it is all about trial and error. There is no one way to work. There is no one way to do this. There is no one process. There is no one answer.

And to continue along that line…there is no “one” movie. You can take the material we have, and material yet to be acquired (music production, external interviews) and use that data to make a movie. Or a million movies. The choices of possibilities are endless. The permutations are endless.

There is no right. There is no wrong. What you can do…hopefully…is find a way to…tell a story. To connect to a viewer. To capture an audience.

To entertain…

It takes an artist!

Leave a comment